September 14, 2014

chutzpadik:

hahaha yeah guess what???? wanna know why autistic people like to talk about autistic pride??

it’s because society tells us our lives have no value, because everyone around us suggests we’d be better off dead, better off someone unrecognizable to ourselves, than be the way we are. autistic pride is lifesaving. autistic pride is necessary.

(via hipstervargas)

September 14, 2014
thisiseverydayracism:

dynastylnoire:

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Please share this post and become a MEMBER at http://lakotalaw.org/donate-new to effect permanent change for the Lakota children. The Lakota People’s Law Project and the Lakota tribes of South Dakota have been working on achieving the permanent solution to the corruption of South Dakota’s Department of Social Services by rerouting federal money from the state and getting it directly to the tribes. For this to happen the Lakota tribes will have to overcome many hurdles and organize their own foster care and other family planning programs. Although we have worked on this struggle for over 8 years, we are finally breaking through and creating the system that will prevent Lakota children from being kidnapped by the state of South Dakota and taken from their communities. 8 of the 9 Lakota tribes have applied for federal funding to assist them in planning for the installation of these programs and the Department of Justice, in conjunction with the ACLU, has just released an amicus brief supporting the Lakota children and condemning the practices of South Dakota. The full brief can be read here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/122-1amicusbriefoftheunitedstates8-14-2014.pdf  Please help make this solution a reality by donating to help the Lakota children remain with their families!

boooooooooooooooooooooooooooooost!

SIGNAL BOOST

thisiseverydayracism:

dynastylnoire:

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Please share this post and become a MEMBER at http://lakotalaw.org/donate-new to effect permanent change for the Lakota children.

The Lakota People’s Law Project and the Lakota tribes of South Dakota have been working on achieving the permanent solution to the corruption of South Dakota’s Department of Social Services by rerouting federal money from the state and getting it directly to the tribes. For this to happen the Lakota tribes will have to overcome many hurdles and organize their own foster care and other family planning programs.

Although we have worked on this struggle for over 8 years, we are finally breaking through and creating the system that will prevent Lakota children from being kidnapped by the state of South Dakota and taken from their communities. 8 of the 9 Lakota tribes have applied for federal funding to assist them in planning for the installation of these programs and the Department of Justice, in conjunction with the ACLU, has just released an amicus brief supporting the Lakota children and condemning the practices of South Dakota. The full brief can be read here: https://turtletalk.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/122-1amicusbriefoftheunitedstates8-14-2014.pdf

Please help make this solution a reality by donating to help the Lakota children remain with their families!

boooooooooooooooooooooooooooooost!

SIGNAL BOOST

(via hipstervargas)

September 14, 2014
whedonesque:

Anya and Xander reunited (X)

whedonesque:

Anya and Xander reunited (X)

(via amnesiacxxx)

September 14, 2014

soulpunchftw:

buzzfeedgeeky:

davedash:

This is a kids show.

ADVENTURE TIME LAYING DOWN THE LAW

Adventure Time demonstrates a clearer understanding of morality than 98% of the world’s adult population

(Source: thespoonmissioner, via hipstervargas)

5:48pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z5Ai4y1Qq1uxU
  
Filed under: gifset 
September 14, 2014

swagmage420:

cristalconnors:

"Su-sein…McSweeney…he say…"

Defining moment of this gen 2k10

(Source: doyouthinklisazemoishot, via j-e-s-s-e-j)

September 14, 2014
sharkchunks:

disneypixar:

A trip down sensory lane.

Filmmakers take note- This five second scene not only fully describes a characters backstory, but the entire reason he acts the way he acts through the film, taking him from a villain to a sympathetic character and justifying a total reversal of his actions in the present. In five seconds, this movie does for the development of a character more than most movies do in two hours. This is why you should be studying Disney and Pixar along with Martin Scorsese and Stanley Kubrick.

sharkchunks:

disneypixar:

A trip down sensory lane.

Filmmakers take note- This five second scene not only fully describes a characters backstory, but the entire reason he acts the way he acts through the film, taking him from a villain to a sympathetic character and justifying a total reversal of his actions in the present. In five seconds, this movie does for the development of a character more than most movies do in two hours. This is why you should be studying Disney and Pixar along with Martin Scorsese and Stanley Kubrick.

(via hipstervargas)

September 14, 2014
stardust-rain:

dollygale:

brandx:

dorianthewellendowed:

jimmyfury:

zarabithia:

queerhawkeye:

beanarie:

Yeeeees? And?

I’m taking this as a compliment to Elementary.

LOL.
Not Featuring A Dude Who Makes Rape Jokes is `100% a compliment.

Not mayo on white bread.


#Not a show where women are punchlines?#Not a show where women are reduced to sexy plot devices or bitches?#Not a show with only 1 poc regular cast member despite the series taking place in one of the most culturally diverse cities#in the english speaking world?#OH NO#OH GOSH HOW TERRIBLE.


Not a show helmed by a dude so racist he regurgitates Yellow Peril conspiracy theories circa 1898.
Not a show that reduces WOC to antagonistic shrews/wilting lotus flowers but rather casts a WOC in the lead to totally pwn a white British supervillain that tries to reduce her to a ‘mascot’
Not a show that constantly queerbaits its viewers and mocks them for daring to interpret the characters as anything other than cishet men.

a show featuring 100% canon trans and gay characters that handles them like real human beings a show that turns misogynistic tropes on their heads a show that calls its white male protagonists out on his shita show with an adaptation of sherlock who praises women a show with flawless writing that showcases how women actually actdo i really need to go on

not a show that features orientalist ~chinese music~ every time joan watson is on screen
not a show that fetishizes lesbian women and has them fall for the straight white man

stardust-rain:

dollygale:

brandx:

dorianthewellendowed:

jimmyfury:

zarabithia:

queerhawkeye:

beanarie:

Yeeeees? And?

I’m taking this as a compliment to Elementary.

LOL.

Not Featuring A Dude Who Makes Rape Jokes is `100% a compliment.

Not mayo on white bread.

Not a show helmed by a dude so racist he regurgitates Yellow Peril conspiracy theories circa 1898.

Not a show that reduces WOC to antagonistic shrews/wilting lotus flowers but rather casts a WOC in the lead to totally pwn a white British supervillain that tries to reduce her to a ‘mascot’

Not a show that constantly queerbaits its viewers and mocks them for daring to interpret the characters as anything other than cishet men.

a show featuring 100% canon trans and gay characters that handles them like real human beings
a show that turns misogynistic tropes on their heads
a show that calls its white male protagonists out on his shit
a show with an adaptation of sherlock who praises women
a show with flawless writing that showcases how women actually act
do i really need to go on

not a show that features orientalist ~chinese music~ every time joan watson is on screen

not a show that fetishizes lesbian women and has them fall for the straight white man

(Source: winston5mith, via hipstervargas)

September 14, 2014
thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via lettyortiz)

September 14, 2014

ughjosh:

I just want your lips against mine and your hand on my butt.

(Source: ughjosh, via love-laugh-dance-drinkcoffee)

September 14, 2014

enattendantlesoleil:

me during classes

  • "that’s racist"
  • "that’s sexist"
  • "there are more than two genders"
  • "ok but could we maybe not use that word"
  • "that’s ableist"
  • "there aren’t enough girls in here"

(via pandamiglio)

September 14, 2014

pitbull looks like the naked mole rat from kim possible

do you see it

image

d o  y o u 

image

(Source: emblemthrees, via j-e-s-s-e-j)

September 14, 2014

(Source: questionall, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

September 14, 2014

sangheliios:

ppl who always automatically assume every alien race is monogamous/heterosexual/has the same exact concept of gender

image

(via hipstervargas)

September 14, 2014
tormy-pickeels:

nice how they gave the murderer a chance to clear out his social media history to protect his reputation while the unarmed black teen who got shot had his reputation dragged through the mud

tormy-pickeels:

nice how they gave the murderer a chance to clear out his social media history to protect his reputation while the unarmed black teen who got shot had his reputation dragged through the mud

(Source: justice4mikebrown, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

September 14, 2014
footybedsheets:

"40% of Afghanistan’s skateboarders are female.100 % of those are tough as nails. " Source: @Skateistan

footybedsheets:

"40% of Afghanistan’s skateboarders are female.100 % of those are tough as nails. "
Source: @Skateistan

(via gole-yakh)

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