August 16, 2011
"

FIRST OF ALL, IN FAIRNESS TO THIS GENTLEMAN WHO RAISED A QUESTION, I ABSOLUTELY AGREE THAT EVERYBODY NEEDS TO TRY TO TONE DOWN THE RHETORIC.

…NOW, IN FAIRNESS, SINCE I’VE BEEN CALLED A SOCIALIST WHO WASN’T BORN IN THIS COUNTRY, WHO IS DESTROYING AMERICA AND TAKING AWAY ITS FREEDOMS BECAUSE I PASSED A HEALTH CARE BILL, I’M ALL FOR LOWERING THE RHETORIC.

"

President BARACK OBAMA, confronting a Tea Party leader in Iowa, who took Obama to task for Joe Biden’s reported labeling of the right-wing faction of the Republican party as “terrorists.”

Awww, did the Tea Party’s “Obama is a Muslim, Obama go back to Kenya, Obama isn’t American, Obama is a socialist, Obama’s policies are like Hitler’s, etc. etc.” feelings get hurt?

But we really should tone down the rhetoric.  Even against the dickheads in the Tea Party!

Starting now.

(via USA Today)

(Source: inothernews, via thesoapboxschtick)

August 20, 2011
theatlantic:

Woot Now an *Official* Word According to the Concise OED

A new edition of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary arrives in stores today, and it contains some 400 new(ish) words, including woot, sexting, retweet, and cyberbullying. To make room for the new, some words that have fallen out of use had to be excised from the edition’s pages, such as “brabble” (meaning “paltry noisy quarrel”) and “growlery” (a “place to growl in, private room, den”). The editor of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary notes that we might call a growlery a “man cave” nowadays, but growlery is so evocative I hope it makes a comeback.

theatlantic:

Woot Now an *Official* Word According to the Concise OED

A new edition of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary arrives in stores today, and it contains some 400 new(ish) words, including woot, sexting, retweet, and cyberbullying. 

To make room for the new, some words that have fallen out of use had to be excised from the edition’s pages, such as “brabble” (meaning “paltry noisy quarrel”) and “growlery” (a “place to growl in, private room, den”). The editor of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary notes that we might call a growlery a “man cave” nowadays, but growlery is so evocative I hope it makes a comeback.

(via atomicyawn)

9:13am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z5Ai4y8YCKa6
  
Filed under: language OED news 
August 22, 2011

cornachio:

Jon Stewart- How Rick Perry was created

(Source: thesoapboxschtick)

August 25, 2011
"No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true."

Steve Jobs’s Best Quotes - Digits - WSJ / via @jenvalentino (via amzam)

(via npr)

September 17, 2011
ilyagerner:

jasencomstock:

kohenari:

After yesterday’s post on the Tea Party debate audience cheering about either liberty or the death of an uninsured man, this story is literally unbelievable to me:

Back in 2008, Ron Paul’s 49-year-old campaign manager died of pneumonia, leaving his family $400,000 worth of medical bills.
… 
Mr. Snyder, 49 years old, died of complications from pneumonia on June 26 — exactly two weeks after Mr. Paul formally ended his presidential campaign. He is survived by his mother and two sisters. Friends of Mr. Snyder created a Web site on July 2 to help his family pay the estimated $400,000 in medical bills accrued because Mr. Snyder didn’t have health insurance.
The site is hoping to tap into the same base of small donors that filled Mr. Paul’s campaign coffers. “Kent was the man that made the campaign possible, and inspired everyone that he met,” wrote Justine Lam, a former Paul campaign aide, on the memorial Web site.

Leaving aside the fact that it was Ron Paul who got the question the other night about whether or not society ought to let exactly such a man die, and that Paul’s answer was that the man’s bills should be paid by private charities — like his donors who paid this particular man’s bills, I suppose — let’s try to imagine a world in which it’s possible for someone without medical insurance to get treatment without accruing hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. I mean, let’s leave aside the question of why such a person doesn’t have insurance entirely and just focus on the outcome. We can deal with the other issues at some other time.
So, with that in mind, is such a world a possibility? Or is the only way forward for our society the one that Paul envisions, where everyone simply throws the dice, hopes for the best, and then leaves someone else to settle an impossibly expensive bill? What could possibly cause you to select this second option … especially if you had this first-hand experience?
HT: James Pauley.

This is mundane, but also, so, in the Ron Paul land of the future (or Rick Perry or whatever because there isn’t much of a difference really) So, the Charities are going to foot the bill for people who can’t pay, which means in the future there is not preventative care so we will be paying for shit at its most expensive and somehow this is supposed to be a better system?
whatever, fine.

Not sure it would be more expensive overall. Is amputating a diabetic’s leg at 50 and then having them die 10 years later more expensive than keeping them on a steady insulin regimen and then having to pay for Alzheimer’s care until he’s 95?
Preventive care increases QALYs, but I’m not sure it saves money in the long haul. I’ll have to look up the studies.
But the latter point — preventive care might not really save money — just illustrates the fallacy of thinking about government as a business enterprise. If it was a business enterprise, the appropriate thing to do would be to combine the two favorite activities of GOP debate audiences — lethal injection and letting the uninsured die — and just hook up the uninsured with some potassium chloride and call it a day. If, however, you think government is a moral enterprise aimed at insuring the public welfare, then it makes sense to pay for preventive care for all, even if that’s expensive in the long term.

ilyagerner:

jasencomstock:

kohenari:

After yesterday’s post on the Tea Party debate audience cheering about either liberty or the death of an uninsured man, this story is literally unbelievable to me:

Back in 2008, Ron Paul’s 49-year-old campaign manager died of pneumonia, leaving his family $400,000 worth of medical bills.

Mr. Snyder, 49 years old, died of complications from pneumonia on June 26 — exactly two weeks after Mr. Paul formally ended his presidential campaign. He is survived by his mother and two sisters. Friends of Mr. Snyder created a Web site on July 2 to help his family pay the estimated $400,000 in medical bills accrued because Mr. Snyder didn’t have health insurance.

The site is hoping to tap into the same base of small donors that filled Mr. Paul’s campaign coffers. “Kent was the man that made the campaign possible, and inspired everyone that he met,” wrote Justine Lam, a former Paul campaign aide, on the memorial Web site.

Leaving aside the fact that it was Ron Paul who got the question the other night about whether or not society ought to let exactly such a man die, and that Paul’s answer was that the man’s bills should be paid by private charities — like his donors who paid this particular man’s bills, I suppose — let’s try to imagine a world in which it’s possible for someone without medical insurance to get treatment without accruing hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. I mean, let’s leave aside the question of why such a person doesn’t have insurance entirely and just focus on the outcome. We can deal with the other issues at some other time.

So, with that in mind, is such a world a possibility? Or is the only way forward for our society the one that Paul envisions, where everyone simply throws the dice, hopes for the best, and then leaves someone else to settle an impossibly expensive bill? What could possibly cause you to select this second option … especially if you had this first-hand experience?

HT: James Pauley.

This is mundane, but also, so, in the Ron Paul land of the future (or Rick Perry or whatever because there isn’t much of a difference really) So, the Charities are going to foot the bill for people who can’t pay, which means in the future there is not preventative care so we will be paying for shit at its most expensive and somehow this is supposed to be a better system?

whatever, fine.

Not sure it would be more expensive overall. Is amputating a diabetic’s leg at 50 and then having them die 10 years later more expensive than keeping them on a steady insulin regimen and then having to pay for Alzheimer’s care until he’s 95?

Preventive care increases QALYs, but I’m not sure it saves money in the long haul. I’ll have to look up the studies.

But the latter point — preventive care might not really save money — just illustrates the fallacy of thinking about government as a business enterprise. If it was a business enterprise, the appropriate thing to do would be to combine the two favorite activities of GOP debate audiences — lethal injection and letting the uninsured die — and just hook up the uninsured with some potassium chloride and call it a day. If, however, you think government is a moral enterprise aimed at insuring the public welfare, then it makes sense to pay for preventive care for all, even if that’s expensive in the long term.

September 18, 2011
plantedcity:

A climate change denial cartoon from the Seattle Post Intelligencer’s David Horsey

plantedcity:

A climate change denial cartoon from the Seattle Post Intelligencer’s David Horsey

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

September 21, 2011
"I feel that I now know what Jewish women went through before the Nazi roundups in France. When they went out in the street they were identified, singled out, they were vilified. Now that’s happening to us."

Kenza Drider, a 32-year-old mother of three, was famously bold enough to appear on French television to oppose the law before it came into force. She refuses to take off her niqab – “My husband doesn’t dictate what I do, much less the government” – but she says she now lives in fear of attack. “I still go out in my car, on foot, to the shops, to collect my kids. I’m insulted about three to four times a day,” she says. Most say, “Go home”; some say, “We’ll kill you.” One said: “We’ll do to you what we did to the Jews.” In the worst attack, before the law came in, a man tried to run her down in his car.

Since France introduced its burqa ban in April there have been violent attacks on women wearing the niqab and, this week, the first fines could be handed down. But a legal challenge to this hard line may yet expose the French state as a laughing stock.(source)

(Source: newsflick, via fsufeministalumna)

September 26, 2011
inothernews:

From the New York Daily News:

Scores of protesters were arrested in Manhattan Saturday as a march against social inequality turned violent.
Hundreds of people carrying banners and chanting “shame, shame” walked between Zuccotti Park, near Wall St., and Union Square calling for changes to a financial system they say unjustly benefits the rich and harms the poor.
At least 80 people were carted away in police vehicles and up to five  were hit with pepper spray near 12th St. and Fifth Ave., where tensions  became especially high, police and organizers said.
The National Lawyer’s Guild, which is providing legal assistance to the protesters, put the number of arrests at 100.
Witnesses said they saw three stunned women collapse on the ground screaming after they were sprayed in the face.
A video posted on YouTube and NYDailyNews.com shows uniformed officers had corralled the women  using orange nets when two supervisors made a beeline for the women, and  at least one suddenly sprayed the women before turning and quickly  walking away.
Footage of other police altercations also circulated online, but it  was unclear what caused the dramatic mood shift in an otherwise peaceful  demonstration.
“I saw a girl get slammed on the ground. I turned around and started screaming,” said Chelsea Elliott, 25, from Greenpoint, Brooklyn,  who said she was sprayed. “I turned around and a cop was coming … we  were on the sidewalk and we weren’t doing anything illegal.”
Police said 80 protesters were arrested or ticketed at multiple  locations for disorderly conduct, blocking traffic and failure to obey a  lawful order but the number could rise.

If the NYPD’s excuse for this disgusting behavior — which should make decent police officers anywhere cringe with shame — is that the protestors didn’t have a permit, then fuck that.  Of course, Mayor Bloomberg is probably off in Bermuda on his usual weekend getaway, so neither he nor his police commissioner, Raymond Kelly, won’t have to be held accountable for these wanton acts of police brutality until Monday.  At least.
For shame.
(Photo: Jefferson Siegel / Daily News)

inothernews:

From the New York Daily News:

Scores of protesters were arrested in Manhattan Saturday as a march against social inequality turned violent.

Hundreds of people carrying banners and chanting “shame, shame” walked between Zuccotti Park, near Wall St., and Union Square calling for changes to a financial system they say unjustly benefits the rich and harms the poor.

At least 80 people were carted away in police vehicles and up to five were hit with pepper spray near 12th St. and Fifth Ave., where tensions became especially high, police and organizers said.

The National Lawyer’s Guild, which is providing legal assistance to the protesters, put the number of arrests at 100.

Witnesses said they saw three stunned women collapse on the ground screaming after they were sprayed in the face.

A video posted on YouTube and NYDailyNews.com shows uniformed officers had corralled the women using orange nets when two supervisors made a beeline for the women, and at least one suddenly sprayed the women before turning and quickly walking away.

Footage of other police altercations also circulated online, but it was unclear what caused the dramatic mood shift in an otherwise peaceful demonstration.

“I saw a girl get slammed on the ground. I turned around and started screaming,” said Chelsea Elliott, 25, from Greenpoint, Brooklyn, who said she was sprayed. “I turned around and a cop was coming … we were on the sidewalk and we weren’t doing anything illegal.”

Police said 80 protesters were arrested or ticketed at multiple locations for disorderly conduct, blocking traffic and failure to obey a lawful order but the number could rise.

If the NYPD’s excuse for this disgusting behavior — which should make decent police officers anywhere cringe with shame — is that the protestors didn’t have a permit, then fuck that.  Of course, Mayor Bloomberg is probably off in Bermuda on his usual weekend getaway, so neither he nor his police commissioner, Raymond Kelly, won’t have to be held accountable for these wanton acts of police brutality until Monday.  At least.

For shame.

(Photo: Jefferson Siegel / Daily News)

(via thesoapboxschtick)

September 27, 2011
"From the moment I took office what we’ve seen is a constant ideological pushback against any kind of sensible reforms that would make our economy work better and give people more opportunity."

Barack Obama, quoted in Obama says GOP would ‘cripple’ America  | ajc.com

Also from this article:

The GOP alternative, Obama said, is “an approach to government that will fundamentally cripple America in meeting the challenges of the 21st century.”

(via tartantambourine)

(via kileyrae)

September 29, 2011
Please reblog this, Tumblr.

rosinhabela:

My name is Kelly Schomburg, I’m the girl with the red hair in these pictures. I was protesting at the Occupy Wall Street march yesterday when I and several other women were sprayed with mace and subsequently arrested. Many have already seen the video, which has been spreading like wildfire over twitter, Facebook, tumblr, and other video feeds, along with hundreds of other photos and videos. This is my recount of what happened.

Read More

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

October 5, 2011
Top 10 Most Censored Stories of 2011

anti-propaganda:

#10 Statistical Games with the Unemployment Rate. At Information Clearing House, Greg Hunter showed that instead of 9%, the real unemployment rate is over 22%.


#9 Chemtrails. Atmospheric Geoengineering: Weather Manipulation, Contrails and Chemtrails, July 10, 2010.


#8 The Truth on Nuclear Power. The Union of Concerned Scientists published a report describing 14 near-miss nuclear accidents in 2010 in the US. (One is Fort Calhoun, which I covered here and here.) Other nuclear pieces mentioned in this category include Jeff Goodell’s “America’s Nuclear Nightmare” at Rolling Stone.


#7 U.S. Army and psychology’s largest experiment – ever. Horrified by war? Be positive! A series of APA articles describing and promoting a program of “psychological resilience” is confronted by Roy Eidelson, Marc Pilisuk and Stephen Soldz at Truthout.


#6 Google Spies for CIA, US Military. In January 2010, Eric Sommer wrote “Google’s Deep CIA Connections” for Pravda.ru.


#5 Prison Companies Fund Anti-Immigrant Legislation. Exposed in depth by Peter Cervantes-Gautschi at AlterNet, Wall Street is profiting from immigrant lock-ups.


#4 Wall Street Engineers Food Crisis. On March 24, 2011, David Moberg wrote “Diet Hard: With a Vengeance” for In These Times showing that speculating on food commodities, along with income inequality, cause hunger – not lack of production.


#3 Obama’s Extrajudicial Hit List. State sanctioned assassinations outside the scope of law is somehow okay by this dictator. This is an under-reported story later covered by Glenn Greenwald atSalon and William Fisher at IPS. Originally titled “Death by Drone: ‘CIA’s hitlist is murder’,” IPS later changed it to “Death by Remote: But Is It Legal?”


#2 Army of Fake Personas to Promote Propaganda. Two sites broke the story on Feb. 22, 2011: Darlene Storm at Computer World and Stephen Webster at Raw Story. In March, Guardian writers Nick Fielding and Ian Cobain covered it.


#1 US Soldier Suicides Exceed Combat Deaths in 2010. Cord Jefferson broke the story on Jan. 27, 2011 at Iceland’s Good Magazine.

(via queerinsurrection)

5:04pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z5Ai4yAJya9O
  
Filed under: censored news 
October 5, 2011
cheatsheet:

The 10 Commandments of Steve Jobs

cheatsheet:

The 10 Commandments of Steve Jobs

9:34pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z5Ai4yAKgQLq
  
Filed under: steve jobs apple news tech 
October 5, 2011
cornachio:

RIP Steve Jobs- Founder of Apple

cornachio:

RIP Steve Jobs- Founder of Apple

(Source: thesoapboxschtick)

October 6, 2011
inothernews:

“The Occupy Wall Street movement has basically been a four-week, downtown Manhattan live-in which has spread to cities all around the country, causing the media to move its coverage dial from ‘Blackout’ to ‘Circus.’  (Beat.)  Those were really the only two settings it has.”

— JON STEWART, The Daily Show

inothernews:

“The Occupy Wall Street movement has basically been a four-week, downtown Manhattan live-in which has spread to cities all around the country, causing the media to move its coverage dial from ‘Blackout’ to ‘Circus.’  (Beat.)  Those were really the only two settings it has.”

— JON STEWART, The Daily Show

October 9, 2011
Time Killer: Some thoughts on Occupy Wall Street

adailyriot:

soupsoup:

I spent a few hours down there tonight.

The crowd is diverse, not as predominately young as I perceived from afar. They’re well organized, they have places set up for medics, food, media, etc. The General Assembly hosts a wide variety of speakers, of all ages, gender, race and socio-economic background. The crowd listens intently to the GA speaker, on the people’s mic, and they do call-and-response so those further back in the crowd can hear the person who has been given the soapbox. This was a real honor to watch.

The folks down there are a lot more nuanced than how they’ve been portrayed. They’re not unsympathetic to the people who have to make a living working for some of the corporations that led to the financial crisis, in fact there are some who spoke at General Assembly tonight who work for or had worked for similar corporations. They’re pragmatic, they’re not anarchists. The whole process is surprisingly organized and democractic. They’re working towards coming up with realistic action items. These people aren’t waiting for someone to save them, they’re working towards how they can save themselves.

…. since when are the words anarchists and democratic separated? Ya’ll are thinking about democracy too much in the US governmental way. Every anarchist gathering I’ve been to have used consensus just as the folks of Occupy Wall Street are doing now. Just sayin.

(via rematiration-deactivated2013111)

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