June 3, 2011
When people say “I think he’s gay” when discussing a man with stereotypical “gay male” features

And I’m just like “Was he involving in sexual intercourse with another man when you saw him? No? Didn’t think so. Did he tell you he was interested in men? Then how the fuck do you know then?” I don’t behave the way I do because I’m straight, I behave the way I do because of how I was raised, and because of the environments that have surrounded me all my life thus far. The fact that I am sexually and romantically interested in women takes no part in what I wear in the morning, or in how I decide to brush my teeth. So let’s stop acting like there’s a preset of behaviors that go with a sexuality, or gender, etc.

August 27, 2011
queergirlfeminist:


Queer Porn Star Accused of Pedophilia for Breastfeeding Baby
By Diane Anderson-Minshall
Weeks after queer porn star Madison Young had her baby, she created an  art exhibit titled “Becoming MILF.” The concept, according to Jezebel.com,  was to explore how Young now embodies a contradiction, the dichotomy to  end all dichotomies — that of the Madonna and the whore. At the show’s  opening, she served up self-made breast-milk shakes and displayed a baby  quilt made of burp cloths and porn star panties. Turns out not every  feminist porn star agrees. According to Salon.com, a series of sex worker Twitter wars ensued, the controversy tapping into “culture-wide mommy issues.”
Porn star Furry Girl (who is known for her, um, stage name–like  features) criticized Young for publicly breast-feeding, tweeting that  only “creeps and pedophiles” are interested in seeing a porn star  breast-feed and insinuated that exposing her child to such an audience  was abusive. Girl called Young a “a revolting person” and dubbed her  defenders “baby fetishists” and “pedos.”
Of course Young (née Tina Butcher) is already a well-known feminist porn  star, director, author, and the founder of Femina Potens, an  ever-evolving, queer and trans nonprofit gallery and performance space  in California that the San Francisco Chronicle calls “the most  happening art space in the city; a revolution in art and sex.” She’s  curated the gallery for years, mixing envelope-pushing women’s sexuality  exhibitions and spoken word shows from lesbians like Annie Sprinkle  with less kinky feminist projects from literati like Michelle Tea.  Young’s shown up on such outlets as IFC and the History Channel and in  MSNBC’s Brian Alexander’s book America Unzipped, which has a whole chapter on her art and work.
So what was this controversial display of pedophilia that Furry Girl imagines? According to Salon,  Young posed for a black-and-white photograph dressed up like Marilyn  Monroe while clutching her daughter to her bare breast, nonchalantly  breast-fed on a video, and then announced that she would nurse live and  in person at an upcoming event meant to promote “health awareness for  our queer, kinky, and sex positive communities.”
At the event itself, Young discussed breast health, while other  presenters talked about breast cancer, antiretroviral drugs, and safe  sex. “It wasn’t a sex party; it was an adult sex-ed class hosted by sex  workers,” writes Salon’s Tracy Clark-Florey.
Furry Girl, an actress in vegan porn, tweeted that context is at  the root of her argument, though she no longer wants to comment on the  debacle. Meanwhile, Young returned to social media in hopes of ending  the Twitter mommy sex wars: “The only one sexualizing this image of me  breastfeeding is you. Which makes me feel truly disgusted and violated.”
Wow.  I think Madison Young’s exhibition sounds really beautiful and confrontational.  This criticism of her public breastfeeding is fucked up.  People in porn still have boobs that are there for feeding babies, yo.  You would think someone who specializes in having body hair would be into the body’s natural processes.  Or at least be an understanding feminist. 

queergirlfeminist:

Queer Porn Star Accused of Pedophilia for Breastfeeding Baby

By Diane Anderson-Minshall

Weeks after queer porn star Madison Young had her baby, she created an art exhibit titled “Becoming MILF.” The concept, according to Jezebel.com, was to explore how Young now embodies a contradiction, the dichotomy to end all dichotomies — that of the Madonna and the whore. At the show’s opening, she served up self-made breast-milk shakes and displayed a baby quilt made of burp cloths and porn star panties. Turns out not every feminist porn star agrees. According to Salon.com, a series of sex worker Twitter wars ensued, the controversy tapping into “culture-wide mommy issues.”

Porn star Furry Girl (who is known for her, um, stage name–like features) criticized Young for publicly breast-feeding, tweeting that only “creeps and pedophiles” are interested in seeing a porn star breast-feed and insinuated that exposing her child to such an audience was abusive. Girl called Young a “a revolting person” and dubbed her defenders “baby fetishists” and “pedos.”

Of course Young (née Tina Butcher) is already a well-known feminist porn star, director, author, and the founder of Femina Potens, an ever-evolving, queer and trans nonprofit gallery and performance space in California that the San Francisco Chronicle calls “the most happening art space in the city; a revolution in art and sex.” She’s curated the gallery for years, mixing envelope-pushing women’s sexuality exhibitions and spoken word shows from lesbians like Annie Sprinkle with less kinky feminist projects from literati like Michelle Tea. Young’s shown up on such outlets as IFC and the History Channel and in MSNBC’s Brian Alexander’s book America Unzipped, which has a whole chapter on her art and work.

So what was this controversial display of pedophilia that Furry Girl imagines? According to Salon, Young posed for a black-and-white photograph dressed up like Marilyn Monroe while clutching her daughter to her bare breast, nonchalantly breast-fed on a video, and then announced that she would nurse live and in person at an upcoming event meant to promote “health awareness for our queer, kinky, and sex positive communities.”

At the event itself, Young discussed breast health, while other presenters talked about breast cancer, antiretroviral drugs, and safe sex. “It wasn’t a sex party; it was an adult sex-ed class hosted by sex workers,” writes Salon’s Tracy Clark-Florey.

Furry Girl, an actress in vegan porn, tweeted that context is at the root of her argument, though she no longer wants to comment on the debacle. Meanwhile, Young returned to social media in hopes of ending the Twitter mommy sex wars: “The only one sexualizing this image of me breastfeeding is you. Which makes me feel truly disgusted and violated.”

Wow.  I think Madison Young’s exhibition sounds really beautiful and confrontational.  This criticism of her public breastfeeding is fucked up.  People in porn still have boobs that are there for feeding babies, yo.  You would think someone who specializes in having body hair would be into the body’s natural processes.  Or at least be an understanding feminist. 

(via karlsparxxx)

August 27, 2011
On Sexuality and “Choice”…

I often hear the argument that sexuality is a choice. What I don’t really understand is how it’s an argument against QUILTBAG individuals. What I mean by not understanding it is that if sexuality were a choice, I’d be supporting QUILTBAG individuals anyways. It doesn’t hurt anyone, and makes people happy. I support that. I should also go ahead and say I don’t buy sexuality being a choice. I just think it doesn’t really make much sense as an argument.

September 9, 2011
"Some sociologists argue that in U.S. culture, girls and women experience a “symbolic clitoridectomy.” In other words, even though women have clitorises in the physical sense, conversations about the clitoris are absent from discussions about sex. This is ironic given the hypersexualization of women’s bodies in mainstream media. When the clitoris is symbolically removed its importance is wildly understated, and presumed insignificant in sexual play."

The Clitoris: Most. Awkward. Discussion. Ever! | SociologyFocus (via linzyxxxxx)

(Source: sociolab, via suchsharpteeth)

September 19, 2011
Free e-book!: Race, ethnicity, and sexuality: intimate intersections, forbidden frontiers

suzyxisntreal:

newwavefeminism:

by Joan Nagel. A great sociologist in the feild of ethnicity and sexuality.

Click the link and enjoy reading the book - jump back and forth between the chapters. (links below!)

INTRODUCTION SEX MATTERS Racing Sex and Sexing Race

 ONE ETHNOSEXUAL FRONTIERS Cruising and Crossing Intimate Intersections

TWO CONSTRUCTING ETHNICITY & SEXUALITY Building Boundaries and Identities

THREE SEX AND CONQUEST Domination and Desire on Ethnosexual Frontiers

FOUR SEX AND RACE The Color of Sex in America

FIVE SEX AND NATIONALISM Sexually Imagined Communities

SIX SEX AND WAR Fighting Men, Comfort Women, and the Military-Sexual Complex

SEVEN SEX AND TOURISM Travel and Romance in Ethnosexual Destinations

EIGHT SEX AND GLOBALIZATION The Global Economy of Desire

CONCLUSION SEX-BAITING AND RACE-BAITING The Politics of Ethnosexuality

(i’m doing research for a sociological study of my own - you all get to reap the fruits of my research)
Enjoy!

Oooooh, very curious to read this!

(via brujacore)

October 7, 2011
"Female orgasm is a different story. Shhh, don’t talk about that – it makes people uncomfortable. Think about it—how many slang terms for female orgasm can you think of? Can you make a list? Are there mainstream movies that depict or discuss girls or women masturbating? Although I can think of a few exceptions (Pleasantville, The OH in Ohio), if female masturbation occurs in mainstream films, it is often told from a male pornographic fantasy perspective (e.g., American Pie). Such media depictions suggest that men have uncontrollable sexual drives, (which, apparently, women do not) that must be satisfied immediately by any means necessary. Unlike men’s, women’s sexual desires are peripheral to our conversations about sex and sexuality."

The Clitoris: Most. Awkward. Discussion. Ever! | SociologyFocus (via linzyxxxxx)

(Source: sociolab, via cubistpizza)

October 10, 2011
Hugo Schwyzer: Amanda Knox Freed, but the Slut-Shaming Goes On

fuckyeahgenderstudies:

Make no mistake, I grieve the loss of Meredith Kercher and the horrible way she died. But I have little doubt that if Knox had been a little less pretty, a little less sexual, and a little less American, she’d never have spent a day in prison for her roommate’s murder.

I rejoice in her freedom today.

Me too.

(via hugoschwyzer-deactivated2013071)

October 12, 2011
"A slut is someone, usually a woman, who’s stepped outside of the very narrow lane that good girls are supposed to stay within. Sluts are loud. We’re messy. We don’t behave. In fact, the original definition of “slut” meant “untidy woman.” But since we live in a world that relies on women to be tidy in all ways, to be quiet and obedient and agreeable and available (but never aggressive), those of us who color outside of the lines get called sluts. And that word is meant to keep us in line."

— Jaclyn Friedman (via rockandrollhigh)

(via suchsharpteeth)

October 24, 2011
"Back in my Press Gang days my defence was always this: sex will always be an exciting mystery to children, they’ll always want to to know about it. And they’ll learn about it, inevitably, from scary porn and all those barmy urban myths that circulate playgrounds. As a counter to that, shouldn’t responisble kids telly at least try to right the balance? Shouldn’t there be someone out there (apart from your boring parents and your boring teachers, who cares what they say) saying that sex is a natural, sometimes funny, sometimes wonderful thing, that decent, kind, nice people do with other decent, kind, nice people. Rather than a sleazy forbidden horror whispered about behind the bike shed.
You CAN’T stop kids finding out about sex. You CAN at least make sure some of what they hear is sane and reasonable."

— Steven Moffat (via tinysprout)

(Source: ileolai, via suchsharpteeth)

May 23, 2012

(via queerocracy)

5:09pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z5Ai4yM0InZ-
  
Filed under: Sex Sexuality Feminism 
September 15, 2012
If You Can Hear Me, Touch Your Nose.

stoya:

A production assistant on a music video shoot I did recently works with children during the week. She said that, for her, the most effective way to get the attention of a group of kids is to stand at the front of the room, loudly say “If you can hear me, touch your nose” and then wait for everyone to have their finger on their nose. She uses this method for large groups of adults, too.

So: If you can read me, touch your nose. 

Thank you.

Pornography is entertainment. Pornography is a business. Pornography is not a substitute for sexual education. The scenarios in porn plots are not a guide to dating or picking up partners for casual sex.

I always figured that anyone old enough to be legally viewing pornography would be able to comprehend the difference between entertainment and real life. I forget that we don’t all understand that a movie like Forrest Gump is not the same as a History Channel documentary on the Vietnam War. I also forget that we don’t all understand that a History Channel documentary on the Vietnam War may not be entirely accurate. I forget that even though pornography is made to be entertaining and portray fantasies, there is a large void in practical sexual education that people sometimes attempt to fill with porn.

I want to believe that people use critical thinking skills. I want to believe that people see Brazzers/Manwin’s Get Rubber campaign and the safer sex/condom use speech at the beginning of Vivid’s DVDs. I want to believe that people watch the pre and post scene interviews included in Kink.com’s videos. I really want to believe that people don’t need to see these disclaimers and interviews to understand that what they are watching is done by tested, consenting professionals. Apparently, though, this comprehension is not always the case.

As adult performers, our job is to show up with a clean STI test and act/perform in an adult production to the director’s satisfaction. It isn’t our responsibility to take on the task of educating people about sexual technique or safer sex practices. Our job description does not include worrying about the people who can’t differentiate between what they see on a screen and what is acceptable behavior in real life, the same as it isn’t Bruce Willis’s job to go around reminding people that action movies are super cool but shooting actual people with real guns isn’t, or that calling 911 is a much better tactic than shooting someone full of adrenaline in the event of a heroin overdose. But some of us do…

There are adult performers and sex workers who talk about these things: When Nina Hartley recounts a recreational sexual encounter on her blog, she regularly mentions the use of condoms and gloves. Sometimes she mentions less standard practices, such as having a specific pair of boots for BDSM that don’t touch the ground outside so that they can be licked without concern for what they’ve walked through. Danny Wylde writes frankly about his experiences in sex work and openly discusses his thoughts and emotions. There are countless others who do frank interviews or keep blogs discussing topics relating to sex work, the adult industry, and sex-for-work vs. sex in personal lives. If someone actually wants to know about porn, there’s a wealth of information online from a variety of perspectives.

We just don’t get nearly the amount of traffic or visibility that a major news outlet gets. Our voices need to be louder, because we are talking. 

October 5, 2012

lacigreen:

“ugh I hate girls”
“girls are such drama queens
“she’s such a whore!” 

why are we women so friggin mean to each other?

on today’s sex+, i’m talkin about GIRL ON GIRL HATE.

August 1, 2013

I overheard a conversation, where a friend of mine (who listens to podcasts to improve his already good english) was recommended Dan Savage. I told him that Dan Savage was a bit of a piece of shit, and that I’d find a better podcast that deals with sex/sexuality/gender, etc. Any recommendations?

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